Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz - feminist, revolutionary, historian Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz
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An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States
Roots of Resistance:
A History of Land Tenure in New Mexico

Blood on the Border: A Memoir of the Contra War
Outlaw Woman: A Memoir of the War Years, 1960-1975
Red Dirt: Growing up Okie

 

 
   

Forthcoming September 16, 2014
An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States

Today, in the United States, there are more than five hundred federally recognized indigenous communities and nations comprising nearly three million people. These individuals are the descendants of the once fifteen million people who inhabited this land and are the subject of the latest book by noted historian and activist Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz. In An Indigenous Peoples’ History of the United States, Dunbar-Ortiz challenges the founding myth of the United States and shows how policy against the indigenous peoples was genocidal and imperialist—designed to crush the original inhabitants. More>>


New title - 2nd printing
Roots  of  Resistance:
A History of Land Tenure in New Mexico

Roots of Resistance: History of Land Tenure in New Mexico is a new and revised edition of the 1980 UCLA publication  under the same title.   The new edition has a new ending chapter and is updated throughout, with a new Preface by Simon J. Ortiz of Acoma Pueblo.  More>>


Blood on the Border:
A Memoir of the Contra War

With Blood on the Border: A Memoir of the Contra War, Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz presents the third volume in her critically-acclaimed memoir. In this long-awaited book, she vividly recounts on-the-ground memories of the contra war in Nicaragua, chronicling the US-sponsored terror inflicted on the people of Nicaragua following their 1981 election of the Socialist Sandinistas that ousted Reagan darling and vicious dictator Somoza. More>>

 

Outlaw Woman: A Memoir of the War Years, 1960-1975

Dunbar-Ortiz was also a dedicated anti-war activist and organizer throughout the 1960s and 1970s. During the war years she was a fiery, indefatigable public speaker on issues of patriarchy, capitalism, imperialism, and racism. She worked in Cuba with the Venceremos Brigade and formed associations with other revolutionaries across the spectrum of radical and underground politics, including the SDS, the Weather Underground, the Revolutionary Union, and the African National Congress. But unlike the majority of those in the New Left, Dunbar-Ortiz grew up poor, female, and part-Indian in rural Oklahoma, and she often found herself at odds not only with the ruling class but also with the Left and with the women's movement. More>>

 

 

Red Dirt: Growing up Okie

At once sweetly nostalgic and inexorably grim, a true study of light and dark. Village Voice

When the peasants are deprived of fields to work, so goes the chorus of an old Irish ballad, all that is left is the love of the land. In this exquisite rendering of her childhood in rural Oklahoma, from the Dust Bowl days to the end of the Eisenhower era, Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz bears witness to a family and community which still clings to the dream of America as a republic of landowners. More>>

 

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